May critical reading is tonight!

Tonight is the night! Join us at 7PM at the Capital Club for a discussion of A Tiny Feast by Chris Adrian.

Questions to ponder beforehand:

  1. This story juxtaposes the fantastic and the tragic. How are the two worlds blended? What details on either side of the coin make this believable? What does this accomplish in the reader?
  2. The main characters are utterly unrealistic yet relatable–what details give them depth? Which bits of dialogue in particular help build the characters?
  3. The boy at the center of the story is kept mostly silent–what does this accomplish?
  4. How does the author shape or present grief in a way that keeps the story from veering into melodrama? How does the sentence structure “package” the grief?

That’s it for questions. Bring your thoughts on this piece and your own questions to tonight’s meeting.

Each month, the reading workshop meets to read the work of a published author from a writer’s perspective, breaking down what makes the story work and why. It’s one of the best ways you can improve as a writer. Never been to a workshop? Check out our FAQ.

This event is free and open to the public, and you do not need to be a CCC member to attend. The Capital Club is located on the lobby floor of the Doubletree Suites Hotel on South Front Street. Get more details in this ancient blog post.

Check back next week when we’ll be posting discussion questions for you to mull over before the meetup.

Questions? Comments? Got a story you’d love to discuss? Send them to the workshop moderator at nick@ohiowriters.org. See you there!

May Critical Reading

Do you believe in fairies? Do you? If you do, clap your hands and join us for the May critical reading discussion, where we’ll be reading A Tiny Feast by Chris Adrian, a tale of fairies and leukemia. The full text of this story can be found here.

This month’s discussion will take place May 24th at 7:00 PM at the Columbus Capital Club.

Each month, the reading workshop meets to read the work of a published author from a writer’s perspective, breaking down what makes the story work and why. It’s one of the best ways you can improve as a writer. Never been to a workshop? Check out our FAQ.

This event is free and open to the public, and you do not need to be a CCC member to attend. The Capital Club is located on the lobby floor of the Doubletree Suites Hotel on South Front Street. Get more details in this ancient blog post.

Check back next week when we’ll be posting discussion questions for you to mull over before the meetup.

Questions? Comments? Got a story you’d love to discuss? Send them to the workshop moderator at nick@ohiowriters.org. See you there!

Critical Reading is Tonight!

Join us tonight for a discussion of Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber. The meeting will take place at the Capital Club at 7 PM.

Here are a few questions for you to chew over before the meeting:

  1. The author attempts to use the narrative voice to help construct the setting–did you find any phrases, sentence structures, or vocabulary to be particularly Victorian? Where there any instances where the author failed in this attempt? Any instances where she broke the Victorian voice for something more modern?
  2. This is, ostensibly, a thriller or work of suspense–how did the pacing work for you? How did you feel about the placement of the details/instances that were used to bring out about the rising tension?
  3. The author spends a lot of space in this story constructing a certain tension between the male gaze and female lust–how did you feel about these passages? Were they artfully constructed? Did they convey the author’s intent?
  4. The works of Debussy are a recurring theme in this story. If you have time, listen to Debussy’s Nuages (which translates to clouds). You can find a recording of the piece here. Do you find the story to be reminiscent of this piece of music?
  5. How did you feel about the ending? This short story was first published in 1979–do you thing that this ending would have “passed muster” if it were submitted for publishing now?

That’s it for questions. Bring your thoughts on this piece and your own questions about it to tonight’s meeting.

Each month, the reading workshop meets to read the work of a published author from a writer’s perspective, breaking down what makes the story work and why. It’s one of the best ways you can improve as a writer. Never been to a workshop? Check out our FAQ.

This event is free and open to the public, and you do not need to be a CCC member to attend. The Capital Club is located on the lobby floor of the Doubletree Suites Hotel on South Front Street. Get more details in this ancient blog post.

Check back next week when we’ll be posting discussion questions for you to mull over before the meetup.

Questions? Comments? Got a story you’d love to discuss? Send them to the workshop moderator at nick@ohiowriters.org. See you there!

April Critical Reading Workshop

April is the cruelest month (according to T.S. Eliot), so for this month’s critical reading discussion we’ll be reading Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber–a modern retelling of the French folktale of the notoriously cruel Bluebeard.  The full text of this story can be found here.

This month’s discussion will be held Wednesday April 19 at 7 pm.

Each month, the reading workshop meets to read the work of a published author from a writer’s perspective, breaking down what makes the story work and why. It’s one of the best ways you can improve as a writer. Never been to a workshop? Check out our FAQ.

This event is free and open to the public, and you do not need to be a CCC member to attend. The Capital Club is located on the lobby floor of the Doubletree Suites Hotel on South Front Street. Get more details in this ancient blog post.

Check back next week when we’ll be posting discussion questions for you to mull over before the meetup.

Questions? Comments? Got a story you’d love to discuss? Send them to the workshop moderator at nick@ohiowriters.org. See you there!

Critical Reading Workshop is Tonight!

We’ll be critiquing Michael Chabon’s Werewolves in Their Youth at the Capital Club this evening. Bring your thoughts, comments, and your teenage angst!

Questions to ponder while reading:

  1. Chabon is sometimes referred to as one of the foremost “stylists” of his generation (referring not, I think, to a propensity for playing with hair, but rather a propensity for playing with sentence structure)–did any of the sentences in this story strike you as being particularly well formed? Did you notice instances in which the sentence structure or paragraph structure helped carrying the meaning of the text? Were any sentences that were out and out duds?
  2. This story attempts to portray the inner and outer worlds of beleaguered tween boys–how does Chabon build these worlds? What details does he use to make them believable? What details does he leave out? What sort of building block short cuts does he use?
  3. The story is split into two distinct halves and two distinct settings–how does this structure help carry the story’s message and intent?

That’s it for questions!

As always, this event is free and open to the public, and you do not need to be a CCC member to attend. The Capital Club is located on the lobby floor of the Doubletree Suites Hotel on South Front Street. Get more details in this ancient blog post.

Check back next week when we’ll be posting discussion questions for you to mull over before the meetup.

Questions? Comments? Got a story you’d love to discuss? Send them to the workshop moderator at heather@ohiowriters.org. See you there.